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1814
GManNickG

After reading "Hidden Features and Dark Corners of C++/STL" on comp.lang.c++.moderated, I was completely surprised that it compiled and worked in both Visual Studio 2008 and G++ 4.4. The code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
     int x = 10;
     while( x --> 0 ) // x goes to 0
     {
       printf("%d ", x);
     }
}

Where in the standard is this defined, and where did it come from?

I'd assume C, since it works in GCC as well, but I put C++ on there just in case C++ has more to mention on it. On a more subjective note, I've never heard of this before, had anybody else? Is it worth using?

Answered By: Charles Salvia ( 1680)

That's not an operator -->. That's two separate operators, -- and >.

Your condition code is decrementing x, while returning xs original (not decremented) value, and then comparing the original value with 0 using the > operator.

To better understand, the statement could be as follows:

while( (x--) > 0 )

I'm using JSLint to go through some horrific JavaScript at work and it's returning a huge number of suggestions to replace == with === when doing things like comparing idSele_UNVEHtype.value.length == 0 inside of an if statement.

I'm basically wondering if there is a performance benefit to replacing == with ===. Any performance improvement would probably be welcomed as there are hundreds (if not thousands) of these comparison operators being used throughout the file.

I tried searching for relevant information to this question, but trying to search for something like "=== vs ==" doesn't seem to work so well with search engines...


So... Would I be correct in assuming that if no type conversion takes place, there would be a small (probably extremely small) performance gain over ==?

Answered By: Bill the Lizard ( 962)

The identity (===) operator behaves identically to the equality (==) operator except no type conversion is done, and the types must be the same to be considered equal.

Reference: Javascript Tutorial: Comparison Operators

The == operator will compare for equality after doing any necessary type conversions. The === operator will not do the conversion, so if two values are not the same type === will simply return false. It's this case where === will be faster, and may return a different result than ==. In all other cases performance will be the same.

To quote Douglas Crockford's excellent JavaScript: The Good Parts,

JavaScript has two sets of equality operators: === and !==, and their evil twins == and !=. The good ones work the way you would expect. If the two operands are of the same type and have the same value, then === produces true and !== produces false. The evil twins do the right thing when the operands are of the same type, but if they are of different types, they attempt to coerce the values. the rules by which they do that are complicated and unmemorable. These are some of the interesting cases:

'' == '0'           // false
0 == ''             // true
0 == '0'            // true

false == 'false'    // false
false == '0'        // true

false == undefined  // false
false == null       // false
null == undefined   // true

' \t\r\n ' == 0     // true

The lack of transitivity is alarming. My advice is to never use the evil twins. Instead, always use === and !==. All of the comparisons just shown produce false with the === operator.


Update:

A good point was brought up by @Casebash in the comments and in @Phillipe Laybaert's answer concerning reference types. For reference types == and === act consistently with one another (except in a special case).

var a = [1,2,3];
var b = [1,2,3];

var c = { x: 1, y: 2 };
var d = { x: 1, y: 2 };

var e = "text";
var f = "te" + "xt";

a == b            // false
a === b           // false

c == d            // false
c === d           // false

e == f            // true
e === f           // true

The special case is when you compare a literal with an object that evaluates to the same literal, due to its toString or valueOf method. For example, consider the comparison of a string literal with a string object created by the String constructor.

"abc" == new String("abc")    // true
"abc" === new String("abc")   // false

Here the == operator is checking the values of the two objects and returning true, but the === is seeing that they're not the same type and returning false. Which one is correct? That really depends on what you're trying to compare. My advice is to bypass the question entirely and just don't use the String constructor to create string objects.

702
Honza Brabec

Until today I thought that for example:

i += j;

is just a shortcut for:

i = i + j;

But what if we try this:

int i = 5;
long j = 8;

Then i = i + j; will not compile but i += j; will compile fine.

Does it mean that in fact i += j; is a shortcut for something like this i = (type of i) (i + j)?

I've tried googling for it but couldn't find anything relevant.

Answered By: Lukas Eder ( 504)

As always with these questions, the JLS holds the answer. In this case §15.26.2 Compound Assignment Operators. An extract:

A compound assignment expression of the form E1 op= E2 is equivalent to E1 = (T)((E1) op (E2)), where T is the type of E1, except that E1 is evaluated only once.

And an example:

For example, the following code is correct:

short x = 3;
x += 4.6;

and results in x having the value 7 because it is equivalent to:

short x = 3;
x = (short)(x + 4.6);

In other words, your assumption is correct.

594
anon

What is this?

This is a collection of questions that come up every now and then about syntax in PHP. This is also a Community Wiki, so everyone is invited to participate in maintaining this list.

Why is this?

Stack Overflow does not allow searching for particular characters. As a consequence, many questions about operators and other syntax tokens are not found easily when searching for them. This also makes closing duplicates more difficult. The list below is to help with this issue.

The main idea is to have links to existing questions on Stack Overflow, so it's easier for us to reference them, not to copy over content from the PHP Manual.

What should I do here?

If you have been pointed here by someone because you have asked such a question, please find the particular syntax below. The linked pages to the PHP manual along with the linked questions will likely answer your question then. If so, you are encouraged to upvote the answer. This list is not meant as a substitute to the help others provided.

The List

If your particular token is not listed below, you might find it in the List of Parser Tokens.


& Bitwise Operators or References


=& References


&= Bitwise Operators


&& Logical Operators


% Arithmetic Operators


!! Logical Operators


@ Error Control Operators


?: Ternary Operator


: Alternative syntax for control structures, Ternary Operator


:: Scope Resolution Operator


\ Namespaces


-> Classes And Objects


=> Arrays


^ Bitwise Operators


>> Bitwise Operators


<< Bitwise Operators


<<< Heredoc or Nowdoc


= Assignment Operators


== Comparison Operators


=== Comparison Operators


!== Comparison Operators


!= Comparison Operators


<> Comparison Operators


| Bitwise Operators


|| Logical Operators


~ Bitwise Operators


+ Arithmetic Operators, Array Operators


+= Assignment Operators


++ Incrementing/Decrementing Operators


.= Assignment Operators


. String Operators


, Function Arguments


$$ Variable Variables


` Execution Operator


<?= Short Open Tags


[] Arrays


<? Opening and Closing tags


Answered By: Peter Ajtai ( 131)

Incrementing / Decrementing Operators

++ increment operator

-- decrement operator

Example    Name              Effect
---------------------------------------------------------------------
++$a       Pre-increment     Increments $a by one, then returns $a.
$a++       Post-increment    Returns $a, then increments $a by one.
--$a       Pre-decrement     Decrements $a by one, then returns $a.
$a--       Post-decrement    Returns $a, then decrements $a by one.

These can go before or after the variable. Putting this operator before the variable is slightly faster.

If put before the variable, the increment / decrement operation is done to the variable first then the result is returned. If put after the variable, the variable is first returned, then the increment / decrement operation is done.

For example:

$apples = 10;
for ($i = 0; $i < 10; ++$i)
{
    echo 'I have ' . $apples-- . " apples. I just ate one.\n";
}

Live example

In the case above ++$i is used, since it is faster. $i++ would have the same results.

However, you must use $apples--, since first you want to display the current number of apples, and then you want to subtract one from it.

You can also increment letters in PHP:

$i = "a";
while ($i < "c")
{
    echo $i++;
}

Once z is reached aa is next, and so on.

Note that character variables can be incremented but not decremented and even so only plain ASCII characters (a-z and A-Z) are supported.


Stack Overflow Posts:

Does Python have a ternary conditional operator? If not, is it possible to simulate one concisely using other language constructs?

Answered By: Vinko Vrsalovic ( 560)

Yes, it was added in version 2.5. It's frowned upon by some pythonistas, so keep that in mind.
The syntax is:

a if test else b

First test is evaluated, then either a or b is returned based on the Boolean value of test;
if test evaluates to True a is returned, else b is returned.

For example:

>>> 'true' if True else 'false'
'true'
>>> 'true' if False else 'false'
'false'

Official documentation:

What are the basic rules and idioms for operator overloading in C++?

Note: The answers were given in a specific order, but since many users sort answers according to votes, rather than the time they were give, here's an index of the answers in the order in which they make most sense:

(Note: This is meant to be an entry to Stack Overflow's C++ FAQ. If you want to critique the idea of providing an FAQ in this form, then the posting on meta that started all this would be the place to do that. Answers to that question are monitored in the C++ chatroom, where the FAQ idea started out in the first place, so your answer is very likely to get read by those who came up with the idea.)

Answered By: sbi ( 142)

The Three Basic Rules of Operator Overloading in C++

When it comes to operator overloading in C++, there are three basic rules you should follow. As with all such rules, there are indeed exceptions. Sometimes people have deviated from them and the outcome was not bad code, but such positive deviations are few and far between. At the very least, 99 out of 100 such deviations I have seen were unjustified. However, it might just as well have been 999 out of 1000. So you’d better stick to the following rules.

  1. Whenever the meaning of an operator is not obviously clear and undisputed, it should not be overloaded. Instead, provide a function with a well-chosen name.
    Basically, the first and foremost rule for overloading operators, at its very heart, says: Don’t do it. That might seem strange, because there is a lot to be known about operator overloading and so a lot of articles, book chapters, and other texts deal with all this. But despite this seemingly obvious evidence, there are only a surprisingly few cases where operator overloading is appropriate. The reason is that actually it is hard to understand the semantics behind the application of an operator unless the use of the operator in the application domain is well known and undisputed. Contrary to popular believe, this is hardly ever the case.

  2. Always stick to the operator’s well-known semantics.
    C++ poses no limitations on the semantics of overloaded operators. Your compiler will happily accept code that implements the binary + operator to subtract from its right operand. However, the users of such an operator would never suspect the expression a + b to subtract a from b. Of course, this supposes that the semantics of the operator in the application domain is undisputed.

  3. Always provide all out of a set of related operations.
    Operators are related to each other and to other operations. If your type supports a + b, users will expect to be able to call a += b, too. If it supports prefix increment ++a, they will expect a++ to work as well. If they can check whether a < b, they will most certainly expect to also to be able to check whether a > b. If they can copy-construct your type, they expect assignment to work as well.


Continue to The Decision between Member and Non-member.

I've been attempting to learn C in my spare time, and other languages (C#, Java, etc.) have the same concept (and often the same operators) ...

What I'm wondering is, at a core level, what does bit-shifting (<<, >>, >>>) do, what problems can it help solve, and what gotchas lurk around the bend? In other words, an absolute beginner's guide to bit shifting in all its goodness.

Answered By: Derek Park ( 392)

The bit shifting operators do exactly what their name implies. They shift bits. Here's a brief (or not-so-brief) introduction to the different shift operators.

The Operators

  • >> is the arithmetic (or signed) right shift operator.
  • >>> is the logical (or unsigned) right shift operator.
  • << is the left shift operator, and meets the needs of both logical and arithmetic shifts.

All of these operators can be applied to integer values (int, long, possibly short and byte or char). In some languages, applying the shift operators to any datatype smaller than int automatically resizes the operand to be an int.

Note that <<< is not an operator, because it would be redundant. Also note that C and C++ do not distingiush between the right shift operators. They provide only the >> operator, and the shifting behavior is implementation defined.


Left shift (<<)

Integers are stored, in memory, as a series of bits. For example, the number 6 stored as a 32-bit int would be:

00000000 00000000 00000000 00000110

Shifting this bit pattern to the left one position (6 << 1) would result in the number 12:

00000000 00000000 00000000 00001100

As you can see, the digits have shifted to the left by one position, and the last digit on the right is filled with a zero. You might also note that shifting left is equivalent to multiplication by powers of 2. So 6 << 1 is equivalent to 6 * 2, and 6 << 3 is equivalent to 6 * 8. A good optimizing compiler will substitute shifts for multiplications when possible.

Non-circular shifting

Please note that these are not circular shifts. Shifting this value to the left by one position (3,758,096,384 << 1):

11100000 00000000 00000000 00000000

results in 3,221,225,472:

11000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

The digit that gets shifted "off the end" is lost. It does not wrap around.


Logical right shift (>>>)

A logical right shift is the converse to the left shift. Rather than moving bits to the left, they simply move to the right. For example, shifting the number 12:

00000000 00000000 00000000 00001100

to the right by one position (12 >>> 1) will get back our original 6:

00000000 00000000 00000000 00000110

So we see that shifting to the right is equivalent to division by powers of 2.

Lost bits are gone

However, a shift cannot reclaim "lost" bits. For example, if we shift this pattern:

00111000 00000000 00000000 00000110

to the left 4 positions (939,524,102 << 4), we get 2,147,483,744:

10000000 00000000 00000000 01100000

and then shifting back ((939,524,102 << 4) >>> 4) we get 134,217,734:

00001000 00000000 00000000 00000110

We cannot get back our original value once we have lost bits.


Arithmetic right shift (>>)

The arithmetic right shift is exactly like the logical right shift, except instead of padding with zero, it pads with the most significant bit. This is because the most significant bit is the sign bit, or the bit that distinguishes positive and negative numbers. By padding with the most significant bit, the arithmetic right shift is sign-preserving.

For example, if we interpret this bit pattern as a negative number:

10000000 00000000 00000000 01100000

we have the number -2,147,483,552. Shifting this to the right 4 positions with the arithmetic shift (-2,147,483,552 >> 4) would give us:

11111000 00000000 00000000 00000110

or the number -134,217,722.

So we see that we have preserved the sign of our negative numbers by using the arithmetic right shift, rather than the logical right shift. And once again, we see that we are performing division by powers of 2.

I'm a teacher, and yesterday a student wrote the following code:

public class Tests {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        int x = 0;
        while(x<3) {
            x = x++;
            System.out.println(x);
        }
    }
}

We know he should have writen just x++ or x=x+1, but on x = x++; it should first attribute x to itself, and later increment x. Why does x continue with 0 as value?

--update

Here's the bytecode:

public class Tests extends java.lang.Object{
public Tests();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[])   throws java.lang.Exception;
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   istore_1
   2:   iload_1
   3:   iconst_3
   4:   if_icmpge   22
   7:   iload_1
   8:   iinc    1, 1
   11:  istore_1
   12:  getstatic   #2; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
   15:  iload_1
   16:  invokevirtual   #3; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(I)V
   19:  goto    2
   22:  return

}

I'll read about the instructions to try to understand...

Answered By: Dan Tao ( 254)

Note: Originally I posted C# code in this answer for purposes of illustration, since C# allows you to pass int parameters by reference with the ref keyword. I've decided to update it with actual legal Java code using the first MutableInt class I found on Google to sort of approximate what ref does in C#. I can't really tell if that helps or hurts the answer. I will say that I personally haven't done all that much Java development; so for all I know there could be much more idiomatic ways to illustrate this point.


Perhaps if we write out a method to do the equivalent of what x++ does it will make this clearer.

public MutableInt postIncrement(MutableInt x) {
    int valueBeforeIncrement = x.intValue();
    x.add(1);
    return new MutableInt(valueBeforeIncrement);
}

Right? Increment the value passed and return the original value: that's the definition of the postincrement operator.

Now, let's see how this behavior plays out in your example code:

MutableInt x = new MutableInt();
x = postIncrement(x);

postIncrement(x) does what? Increments x, yes. And then returns what x was before the increment. This return value then gets assigned to x.

So the order of values assigned to x is 0, then 1, then 0.

This might be clearer still if we re-write the above:

MutableInt x = new MutableInt();    // x is 0.
MutableInt temp = postIncrement(x); // Now x is 1, and temp is 0.
x = temp;                           // Now x is 0 again.

Your fixation on the fact that when you replace x on the left side of the above assignment with y, "you can see that it first increments x, and later attributes it to y" strikes me as confused. It is not x that is being assigned to y; it is the value formerly assigned to x. Really, injecting y makes things no different from the scenario above; we've simply got:

MutableInt x = new MutableInt();    // x is 0.
MutableInt y = new MutableInt();    // y is 0.
MutableInt temp = postIncrement(x); // Now x is 1, and temp is 0.
y = temp;                           // y is still 0.

So it's clear: x = x++ effectively does not change the value of x. It always causes x to have the values x0, then x0 + 1, and then x0 again.


Update: Incidentally, lest you doubt that x ever gets assigned to 1 "between" the increment operation and the assignment in the example above, I've thrown together a quick demo to illustrate that this intermediate value does indeed "exist," though it will never be "seen" on the executing thread.

The demo calls x = x++; in a loop while a separate thread continuously prints the value of x to the console.

public class Main {
    public static volatile int x = 0;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        LoopingThread t = new LoopingThread();
        System.out.println("Starting background thread...");
        t.start();

        while (true) {
            x = x++;
        }
    }
}

class LoopingThread extends Thread {
    public @Override void run() {
        while (true) {
            System.out.println(Main.x);
        }
    }
}

Below is an excerpt of the above program's output. Notice the irregular occurrence of both 1s and 0s.

Starting background thread...
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
290
Peter Olson

I saw a line of C that looked like this:

!ErrorHasOccured() ??!??! HandleError();

It compiled correctly and seems to run ok. It seems to like it's checking if an error has occurred, and if it has, it handles it, but I'm not really sure what it's actually doing or how it's doing it. It does look like the programmer is trying express his feelings about errors.

I have never seen the ??!??! before in any programming language, and I can't find documentation for it anywhere. (Google doesn't help with search terms like ??!??!). What does it do and how does the code sample work?

Answered By: user786653 ( 257)

??! is a trigraph that translates to |. So it says:

!ErrorHasOccured() || HandleError();

which, due to short circuiting, is equivalent to:

if (ErrorHasOccured())
    HandleError();

Guru of the Week (deals with C++ but relevant here), where I picked this up.

Possible origin of trigraphs or as @DwB points out in the comments it's more likely due to EBCDIC being difficult (again). This discussion on the IBM developerworks board seems to support that theory.

From ISO/IEC 9899:1999 §5.2.1.1, footnote 12 (h/t @Random832):

The trigraph sequences enable the input of characters that are not defined in the Invariant Code Set as described in ISO/IEC 646, which is a subset of the seven-bit US ASCII code set.

233
Hexagon Theory

I've seen code that seems to use an operator I don't recognize, in the form of two exclamation points, like so: !!. Can someone please tell me what this operator does?

Answered By: Stevo3000 ( 181)

Converts it to boolean!

!oObject  //Inverted boolean
!!oObject //Non inverted boolean so true boolean representation